Wood anatomy/fiber analysis

Display Name: 
Meaghan Parker
Affiliation: 
World Resources Institute

The Forest Legality Alliance convened its members and partners on July 6 and 7 in the new Harmon Conference Center at World Resources Institute headquarters in Washington, D.C.  With the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) scheduled for the end of September, most of the meeting was focused on the growing profile of timber species in the CITES convention.  The July meeting was the last FLA gathering to be convened under WRI’s C

Display Name: 
Meaghan Parker
Affiliation: 
World Resources Institute

The next and last membership meeting of the Forest Legality Alliance will take place on July 6th and 7th 2016 in Washington, DC.  We would like to share some updates about meeting content and logistics with you, as well as the link for registration.

Author(s)

Jonathan Mason

Seven years ago, Brazil’s São Paulo State Environmental Police set out to crack down on the illegal timber trade. In 2011, during one of their most ambitious inspection operations, officers inspected nearly 350 trucks and more than 60 lumberyards in just two days. Discovering an array of violations, they responded by delivering 50 violation notices and issuing BRL $2.2 million (USD $1.4 million) in fines. 

SPECIAL EDITION: SPOTLIGHT ON TECHNOLOGY
 
Content:
I.  Updates on FLA’s latest activities
II. Trained to fight illegal logging – global genetics movement gathers pace with DNA sampling training in Africa; Latin America next
III. WWF Germany applies a suite of technologies to check species and origin claims
IV. Recent publications
V.  In the news
VI.  Upcoming events

 

Display Name: 
Ruth Nogueron
Affiliation: 
World Resources Institute
Display Name: 
Loretta Cheung
Affiliation: 
Forest Legality Alliance

This booklet provides an overview of key legality issues in the global wood trade that businesses should consider when purchasing wood and paper-based products. Topics covered include trade regulations (e.g., the Lacey Act, the European Union Timber Regulation, and the Australian Illegal Logging Prohibition), public and private procurement policies, trade bans, and resources for meeting legality requirements.

 

This publication provides a brief overview of the various forensic methods available to supplement current timber tracking information systems. They can help verify the accuracy of existing documents and increase transparency in the timber trade. Some methods described include:

  • DNA analysis
  • Stable isotopes
  • Microscopic wood species identification
  • Remote sensing
  • Fiber Analyses